Episode 7 – Artificial Intelligence, our Friend or Foe?

We have three guests on this episode of the podcast, and none of them are human.

On one hand, you’ve got R2D2, Wall-E, and Johnny-5. On the other hand you have HAL-9000, Cylons, and The Terminator. And yet on another hand (this one on a third robotic arm) you have the possibility of a cyborg enhanced self. 43 more words

via Episode 7 – Artificial Intelligence, our Friend or Foe? — Acceptably Real Podcast

Two New Books for 2018

Well, it does indeed look like I have TWO new books coming out this year. For those interested, I’ll update here as they become available.

The Meaning of Life

IN THIS, the latest episode of mine and Joe’s podcast, we ask the Big Question.

Is the purpose of life to be happy? What if you could take a pill and you would be blissfully happy? Is that the end game, then? If not, what is it? Let’s ask the Dalai Lama … or at least a poster of his purported sayings, and test to see if they — or…

via Episode 6 – The Meaning of Life — Acceptably Real Podcast

Hi, I’m Jerry J. Davis

YouTube encourages channel owners to make an “about me” video to be shown to first time visitors. This is the one I just created.

Honesty in Tech Reviews

It’s a bit of a conflict of interest when you get free stuff in exchange for making a video about it, but my loyalty is with the audience. Lately the focus on “influencer marketing” has turned to “micro-influencers,” like myself, which is why I get these gadgets in the mail. The problem is, as with things like the below video, and also with the company that sent me Amazon Echo Cases, they’re products that make little or no sense, and I have to point that out.

It’s like they sit around and think, “what can we make to enhance these successful products,” without really being honest with themselves about the actual value they add to the product.

To be fair, the above battery for the Echo Dot isn’t really a bad idea, but then they also make a “case” so that you can carry it around with you strapped to your backpack.

The only scenario where I see that happening would be a college setting where there is one single WiFi connection across the entire campus. Otherwise, it makes no sense at all.

Simple and Direct Way to Beat Procrastination

Just about any creative-type person faces this demon. I know I do, I’ve been battling it all my life.

There are books about it. Libraries of books about it. There’s a whole industry about beating it. But it all boils down to one simple thing.

And this is it: don’t worry about the whole project, job, dilemma, whatever.

Just concentrate on the very first action. The smallest, simplest first step. Once done, then — and only then — concentrate on the next action.

One footstep at a time.

That’s all it takes. Don’t worry or even think about the overwhelmingness of the whole. Just take that first little step.

Sci-Fi Writers Take Note: There Are Way More Stars Than We Thought


A while ago I read a fascinating news release from JPL about a sounding rocket experiment that measures the light between galaxies. The conclusion: “While we have previously observed cases where stars are flung from galaxies in a tidal stream, our new measurement implies this process is widespread.”

In other words, there are way, way more stars out there than we thought, drifting in-between the galaxies.

From the article: “The light looks too bright and too blue to be coming from the first generation of galaxies,” said James Bock, principal investigator of the CIBER project from Caltech and JPL. “The simplest explanation, which best explains the measurements, is that many stars have been ripped from their galactic birthplace, and that the stripped stars emit on average about as much light as the galaxies themselves.” [My emphasis.]

So for every galaxy of stars out there, there’s another galaxy worth of stars drifting around between the galaxies. To me that means there’s twice as many stars as we thought in the Universe, which also means there’s twice as many chances for habitable worlds.

It also means that in your star trekking speculative fiction, really advanced galactic civilizations could more conceivably make their way to other galaxies, as it’s not a big huge empty stretch between — according to the article, it’s more like a halo of stars between, and perhaps even bridging, the spaces between galaxies.

It’s fascinating to me to think of civilizations developing among these isolated, far flung stars, and now mathematically speaking, the chances of other civilizations existing have essentially doubled.

Okay, I’ve planted the seed in your imaginations. Let them run wild!

Here’s a link to the article: The Universe is Brighter Than We Thought »